Child Custody in Florida

Divorce or separation is one of the most difficult times that any parent or child could possibly face. Almost all divorce cases include one of the spouses moving out and starting another life. These changes almost always lead to changes being made in parental responsibilities and custody. Florida has some laws that help the divorced partners get through such times.

Through the hard times of divorce, life still has to go on for the kids. One common ground that the separating parents will share is the well being of their children. A failed relationship according to child custody laws in Florida does not necessarily mean that the children stop receiving basic needs from their parents. There are in fact laws that are out to ensure fairness in child custody to both parties. The laws focus primarily on the best interest of the child.

Time Sharing

Commonly referred to as time sharing in Florida, joint custody entails handing one parent physical custody of a child while the other one is given visitation rights. Basically, family courts in Florida prefer to give a fair ruling whereby both parents are allowed ample time with their children without having to favor one party.

Focus on the Child

The court tries to consider the best interest of the children first. In order to achieve this feat, the court has order child support according to the state mandated guidelines. Both parties must be willing to adhere to the time-sharing schedule put in place by the court and be able to adjust if some changes are to take place.

The court considers certain factors such as mental, emotional and physical health of each parent, and the stability of both parents. It is the work of the judiciary to ensure that the child is raised in a positive environment and gets the best services from both parents. Cases of child abuse or history of domestic violence helps a lot in deciding such a ruling.

Relocation and Child Custody

Under the child custody laws in Florida, a parent can only relocate with a child if both parties agree. This is done through a formal written agreement that is signed by both parties with detailed information about the relocation. The relocating partner has to produce the date of relocation and the address where he or she is moving to. Time-sharing also has to be discussed with the other parent.

If the parties do not agree, the parent wishing to relocation must file a court action. Just as the child custody laws, any modifications must be made to serve the children’s best interest.

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